Category Archives: Instagram

Instagram Moves to Position of Number Two Social Network in USA

searchInstagram Moves to Position of Number Two Social Network in USA:​
According to the results of a just released study ​eMarketer.com​, the number of U.S. ​Instagram​ users increased nearly 60 percent in 2014, bringing the social network’s U.S monthly user base to 64.2 million people, according to new 
figures from ​eMarketer​. In 2018, Instagram’s U.S. user base will top 100 million—reaching 106.2 
million that year—when growth finally begins to taper off and dips into single digits for the first time. 
 
U.S. Instagram Users and Penetration 
2013-2019 
(Users by millions, % Change and % of Population) 
Year 
No. of Users (millions) 
Year-on-Year Change 
% of population 
2013 
40.2 
+93.6% 
12.7% 
2014 
64.2 
+59.9% 
20.1% 
2015 
77.4 
+20.9% 
24.2% 
2016 
89.4 
+15.1% 
27.6% 
2017 
98.9 
+10.6% 
30.3% 
2018 
106.2 
+7.4% 
32.3% 
2019 
111.6 
+5.0% 
33.6% 
Note: Internet users who access their Instagram account via any device at least once per month 
Source: eMarketer, February 2015 
 
Twitter’s U.S. user base grew 12.1 percent in 2014 to reach 48.4 million users, eMarketer estimates. 
The gap in the number of users between Twitter and Instagram will continue to widen over its 
forecast period, with Twitter’s user growth slowing to single digits starting in 2015.  
 
U.S. Social Network Users and Penetration by Site 
2013-2019 
(Users by millions, % change and % of population) 
Network 
2013 
2014 
2015 
2016 
2017 
2018 
2019 
FACEBOOK 
147.5 
152.5 
157.1 
161.4 
165.7 
169.2 
172.0 
% change 
+4.2% 
+3.4% 
+3.0% 
+2.8% 
+2.6% 
+2.1% 
+1.7% 
% 
population 
46.4% 
47.8% 
48.9% 
49.8% 
50.7% 
51.4% 
51.8% 
INSTAGRAM 
40.2 
64.2 
77.6 
89.4 
98.9 
106.2 
111.4 
% change 
+93.6% 
+59.9% 
+20.9% 
+15.1% 
10.6% 
+7.4% 
+5.0% 
% 
population 
19.7% 
20.1% 
24.2% 
27.6% 
30.3% 
32.3% 
33.6% 
TWITTER 
43.2 
48.4 
53.1 
57.6 
62.0 
66.1 
69.1 
% change 
+19.4% 
+12.1% 
9.6% 
+8.6% 
+7.6% 
+6.6% 
+4.6% 
% 
population 
18.6% 
15.2% 
16.5% 
17.8% 
19.0% 
20.1% 
20.8% 
PINTEREST 
34.9 
42.3 
47.1 
50.7 
53.9 
56.8 
59.3 
% change 
34.5% 
+21.2% 
111.4% 
+7.7% 
+6.3% 
+5.4% 
+4.2% 
% 
population 
+11.0% 
13.3% 
14.6% 
15.7% 
16.5% 
17.3% 
17.9% 
TUMBLR 
13.7 
17.7 
20.6 
22.2 
23.8 
25.4 
26.6 
% change 
+46.2% 
+29.2% 
12.9% 
+11.4% 
+7.2% 
+6.5% 
+4.8% 
% 
population 
4.3% 
5.6% 
6.2% 
+6.9% 
7.3% 
7.7% 
8.0% 
TOTAL 
165.7 
173.6 
180.3 
184.0 
191.2 
195.9 
200.1 
Note: Internet users who access their Facebok, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram and/or Tumbler accounts 
via any device at least once per month; social networking audiences are not mutually exclusive; there 
is overlap between groups. 
Source: eMarketer.com, February 2015 
 
Teens and millennials dominate Instagram’s user base, and through 2019, a majority of the network’s 
users will be between the ages of 12 and 34. In 2015, 20.3 million U.S. Instagram users, or 26.2 
percent of the total, will fall within the 25-to-34 age group, and that group will maintain the largest 
portion of the Instagram audience throughout our forecast. The highest penetration, however, will 
remain in the 12-to-17 age group—61.9 percent of all US teens will use Instagram regularly this year, 
and by 2019, more than three-quarters will be Instagrammers.  
 
Going forward, Instagram will also compete with other emerging social networks for attention among 
these younger demographics, and by extension, for brands’ ad dollars in reaching those demographics. 
However, over time, we believe Instagram’s straightforward and simple content feed has wider 
appeal across all demographics—no matter what age or level of digital savvy. 
 
“Instagram has a lot of momentum in the US, growing faster than Twitter, Pinterest, Tumblr and 
Facebook,” said ​Debra Aho Williamson​, principal analyst at eMarketer. “The simplicity of the app is 
what is most appealing; Instagram has stayed true to its core mission—delivering beautiful imagery 
and videos—while other services, such as Snapchat, have loaded on lots of new features.”  
 
U.S. Instagram User Metrics by Age 
2013-2019 
(Users by millions, % penetration and % share) 
Age Group 
2013 
2014 
2015 
2016 
2017 
2018 
2019 
0-11 
0.3 
0.6 
0.8 
0.9 
1.1 
1.2 
1.3 
% 
population 
0.7% 
1.2% 
1.5% 
1.9% 
2.2 
2.4% 
2.6% 
% share 
0.8% 
0.9% 
1.0% 
1.05 
1.1 
1.1% 
1.1% 
12-17 
8.3 
13.6 
15.5 
16.8 
17.9 
18.4 
18.9 
% 
population 
33.2% 
54.3% 
61.9% 
67.4% 
71.5 
73.9% 
75.4% 
% share 
20.6% 
21.1% 
19.9% 
18.9% 
18.1 
17.4% 
16.9% 
18-24 
9.0 
13.6 
15.4 
17.5 
19.0 
20.2 
21.2 
% 
population 
28.8% 
43.2% 
50.0% 
56.5% 
61.8 
65.9% 
69.3% 
% share 
22.5% 
21.2% 
20.1% 
19.6% 
19.2 
19.0% 
26.5% 
25-34 
11.4  
16.8 
20.3 
23.7 
26.4 
28.2 
29.6 
% 
population 
26.6% 
38.6% 
56.0% 
52.8% 
58.0 
61.2% 
63.6% 
% share 
28.4% 
26.1% 
26.2% 
26.5% 
26.7 
26.5% 
26.5% 
35-44 
4.8 
8.7 
10.9 
12.4 
13.7 
14.9 
15.6 
% 
population 
11.8% 
21.6% 
26.9% 
30.6% 
33.5 
36.0% 
37.1% 
% share 
11.9% 
13.6% 
14.0% 
13.9% 
13.9 
14.1% 
14.0% 
45-54 
3.5 
5.7 
7.4 
9.0 
10.3 
11.2 
12.0 
% 
population 
8.0% 
13.2% 
17.6% 
21.1% 
24.3 
26.8% 
29.0% 
% share 
8.75 
8.9% 
9.8% 
10.1% 
10.4 
10.6% 
10.7% 
55-64 
2.3 
4.0 
5.4 
6.9 
8.0 
9.2 
9.9 
% 
population 
5.7% 
10.0% 
13.2% 
16.5% 
19.1 
21.6% 
23.1% 
% share 
5.6% 
6.3% 
6.9% 
7.7% 
8.1 
8.7% 
8.9% 
65-plus 
0.6 
1.2 
1.6 
2.1 
2.5 
2.9 
3.1 
% 
population 
1.4% 
2.5% 
3.4% 
4.3% 
5.0% 
5.4% 
5.7% 
% share 
1.9% 
1.8% 
2.1% 
2.4% 
2.6% 
2.7% 
2.8% 
Total 
40.2 
64.2 
77.6 
89.4 
98.9 
106.2 
111.6 
% 
population 
12.7% 
20.1% 
24.2% 
27.6% 
30.3% 
32.3% 
33.6% 
Note: Internet users who access their Instagram account via any device at least once per month 
Source: eMarketer, February 2015 
 
 
 

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eTourism Summit 2014 Takeaways

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The “fire hose of information” delivered at #eTS14 is not meant to put fires out, but rather to start more fires burning. Stoke your at-home fires with these top takeaways curated from 22.7K Twitter impressions across the cyberspace that was #eTS14.

Thunderous themes:

  • Be human, not corporate
  • Interact with people
  • Be a story instigator; content is still king
  • Mobile, mobile, mobile
  • China, China, China
  • Music videos: the next frontier for DMOs
  • Free FB lunch is over; use pay-to-play wisely
  • Empower the under-35s 
  • Re-visit and prioritize your SMART KPIs
  • Steal good ideas and scale them to suit

More Key Learning Points

Social Media Platforms

Facebook: Reachpocalypse is real and can only be fought with a compelling content strategy directed at sharing by a committed fan base. Be conversational, use other people’s good content, feature outstanding visuals of food and scenery. Watch for organic to drop to zero and a buy button to appear.

Twitter: is growing up fast. It’s fundamentally changed how we watch TV to make it interactive in real time, explains Brian Carr. One billion conversations are happening every 48 hours; 280M users will likely peak at 300M and 78% use on mobile will rise to 81%. Promoted tweets by keyword and tailored audiences mean it’s time to strategize on a clever campaign. Use Twitter analytics and experiment with Twitter Cards to drive traffic to your website, Lead Generation Cards to capture user interest and emails, App Cards to prompt a download. 

Pinterest: resonates as a visual bookmark which has key impact during dreaming stage. Different to other channels, it’s not about past or present, but future. Works best when you think of your content as actionable, creating travel tips, itineraries, must-dos, free things, etc. It’s OK for a business to start with 24 boards, populated with 20 vertical images on rich pins. Enid Hwang’s tip: omit hashtags, they may penalize you. 

YouTube: 71% of travel searches on YouTube are for specific destinations, trumping search at 58%. Seeing Y-o-Y growth at 179%. Destinations and attractions account for 40% of all travel video views. Talk to your visitor centers, address what people want to know when developing video content. Google’s Shaun Aukland says, “Video is the next frontier.”

Google: Importance of search through the five stages of travel: Inspiration/Planning/Booking/Experiencing/Sharing. Note that if all advertising were to move to mobile-only, that’s OK, since 50% of all travel-related searches are now on mobile. “The importance of mobile is the single most important thing you can take away from this conference,” suggests Shaun Aukland. He emphasizes that the  “under-35s understand this stuff naturally,” and management from the governor’s office right on down should “listen to them, give them budgets and let them lead.” 

Videos

  • Best-practice example: Memphis video kills it in one minute with poetry and a voice over that rivals Richard Burton. – (filmmaker Peter Bragiel, In Transit)
  • Audio is 50% of your presentation. Use music to convey desired mood of video. – (Marla Johnson, Aristotle)
  • The story must be the foreground, the destination is the background. There’s nothing unique about eating out, a nice glass of wine, a swimming pool. Golfers already know where the golf courses are.
  • Remember that Vimeo is where Millennials are hanging out. “Subscribers are currency. Forget views. It’s about how many people have relationships with you.” – (Peter Bragiel, InTransit)

      *  “What are your top 10 Google and YouTube searches? Are you answering those questions with video? Start.”  – (Shaun Aukland, Google) 

  • You can even do it in-house. Too many ideas? Break up the topics into short, separate videos.
  • “Must. Do. More. Video.” – (Melia Dicker, Visit Mississippi)
  • “Like a home video?” Fly the producer over!” – (Peter Bragiel, InTransit)

Social Media & Advanced Social Media Marketing

  • Create a social media culture in your organization. Your chief storyteller and best brand ambassador may be sitting right next to you. – (Gathan Borden, Visit Louisville)
  • Get to your community’s bloggers. You don’t have to be first to the punchline, but do pass the good stories along.
  • Join the Instagram conversation. Among Millennials with smartphones, 43% are using it. Thursday is the biggest day. – (Katie Cook, Visit Austin)
  • “What’s even better than targeting your customer? Finding other ones just like them.” – (David Fluegge, Colorado Tourism)
  • Keep your Facebook and personal pages separate. Business Manager is the solution. – (Josh Collins, Visit Williamson County)
  • Start “thinking like a publisher.” Facebook is. – (Mo Sherifdeen, Travel Oregon)
  • Advanced analytics, custom audiences, lookalike, tracking pixels, using your own mailing list: tools are your friends. “Spray & Pray approach won’t work.” – (David Fluegge, Colorado Tourism)
  • “Native beats banner.” – (Jessica Cox, MMGY Global).  Native advertising is here to stay, so join the crowd, use it wisely. – (TJ Salo, DreamPlanGo)
  • Focus on one KPI at a time or you’ll end up achieving nothing. – (Tess McBride, Sparkloft Media)
  • Consider targeting email unsubscribers to continue conversation elsewhere on social. – (David Fluegge, Tourism Colorado)

       *  “A sense of place is the filter I put every piece of content through. How strongly does it evoke a destination?” – (Talia Salem,  Brand USA)     

Attractions Social Marketing

  • Change happens. “Be tolerant of chaos.  Let the ground move under your feet every single day.” – (Geoff Drake, Monterey Bay Aquarium)
  • Make your organizational chart flat. Employees such as mountain climbers and aquarium explainers are hearing fabulous comments from the public every day. Use compelling, appealing assets from the top of the world to the bottom of the ocean. “Cute baby otters works, too.” – (Geoff Drake and Theresa Ho, Yosemite DNC)
  • Attractions now have the upper hand with flash sale sites. – (Bob Schwartz, Boston Duck Tours)

       *  Vary your content, tone of voice, even grammar and punctuation for each social media platform according to user demographics. It works. – (Amie Wong, California Academy of Sciences)     

  • Mobile bookings means massive opportunities in the tours and activities space, even a storefront within the app. – (Michael Berman, Peek and Alex Bainbridge, TourCMS)

Small Budgets, Limited Resources

  • Maximize Twitter hashtags, Instagram and Pinterest when there’s no money. – (Leslie McLellan, San Jacinto Valley CVB)
  • Video need not be expensive. Maintain the rights and use contest entries.
  • Q: If you could have only one staffer on social media, what skill set? Designer? Photographer? Writer? A: “Don’t overlook a sense of humor.” – (Marla Johnson, Aristotle)  Tip: Check out graduate school of journalism students to find all 4-in-1.
  • Prioritize your channels, prioritize mobile.
  • Develop a tone of voice. (Tucson got 824% FB organic reach with “Advice From a Cactus” post.) Use other people’s content. (ScenicWA got 2500% organic reach with one-a-day image feeds.)

MICE Marketing

  • Look in the right place. You’ll find this audience on LinkedIn. – (Mandy Volpe, UniqueVenues)
  • Use website landing pages for specific types of meetings.
  • Push notifications will be the email marketing of tomorrow.

Experiential Travel

  • The sharing economy is here to stay. Embrace it, work with it.
  • Restaurateurs see EatWith.com as complimentary (appreciation of good food and company), not competitive. – (Guy Michlin, EatWith.com)
  • International visitors wanted to “live like a local.” Now they want to “meet the locals.”
  • The physical distribution of Airbnb changes a visitor’s experience with a destination, since they primarily live an average of 5 days where hotels are not found. – (Andrea La Mesa, Airbnb)

Out-of-the-(Tool) Box Thinking

  • We have street view. We have satellite view. Why not drones? Drones are the something in-between. 
  • Not perfect is the new perfect on Snapchat. You don’t have to maintain the image of a perfection to get engagement. Watch developments: Snapchat Stories, Our Stories and Snapchat geotags…not to mention ads. – (Martin Stoll, Sparkloft Media)
  • Bitcoins have a higher and more steady demand than Expedia anticipated, and “none of us should be ignoring this innovation.” – (Michael Gulmann, Expedia Media Solutions)
  • Google CEO recommends Googlers to work one day/week out of mobile exclusively. Grounds the consumer experience, invites innovation. – (Shaun Aukland, Google)

Media Buying

  • “Data and creativity are the Montagues and Capulets of advertising. They’ll start working together with formidable results.” – (John Durham, Catalyst S+F)
  • “Mobile advertising is in its infancy,” at currently only 2% of all ads. – (Scott Swanson, Opera MediaWorks)
  • Fasten your seat belts, but you don’t have to drive your data as crazily as the big box retailers do. – (Chris Smuthy, Sojern)
  • “The real purchasing strategy lies in the why and the how – not the where and the who.” – (Sabrina Wilson, Ad+Genuity)
  • Evaluate ROI during campaign, not just at completion.
  • Use call to action words appropriately; different ones apply to awareness, inspiration, consideration, activation, re-living.
  • “Invest in storytellers. In Louisiana’s best content, you can just smell the food.”- (John Durham, Catalyst S+F)

“There are three kinds of people: those who make things happen, those who watch things happen and those who wonder what happened.”Nicholas Butler Murray (1862 – 1947) educator, former president of Columbia University

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Filed under Attractions marketing, Digital Tourism Marketing Trends 2015, DMOs, eTourism Summit San Francisco, Facebook, Google, Instagram, KPIs, Native Advertising, Pinterest, Snapchat, Social Media Platforms, Storytelling, TripAdvisor, Twitter, YouTube

10 Takeaways from Our Facebook Pop-Up…

Josh Collins, Williamson Co., (TN) CVB presents his case study on organic reach.

Josh Collins, Williamson Co., (TN) CVB presents his case study on organic reach.

 

        

1)Why Facebook really wants us to refresh business page profile data.

The canned Facebook message to all small businesses is, ‘Back to Basics’ a.k.a ‘Claim Your Page’s Real Estate.’ Scratch a little deeper and the message is: Businesses should clean up page settings and profile data to be discoverable on ‘Nearby.’”  While this optional feature launched in April 2014 was directed at Friends Nearby, the capability is there and it will evolve. It’s not really about helping you to hook up with your friend at a concert, is it?

Moving beyond Friends Nearby, how far behind are geo-tagged ads using beacon technology?

Curate your content carefully; think about what you don't post.

Curate your content carefully; think about what you don’t post.

 

2)“Curate your content like a museum would.” 

Absolutely. What you don’t post is as significant as what you do post, points out Martin Stoll. Social media managers not part-time interns are at the heart of your operation and reputation. They are “thinker, feeler, doer”, who must create and display “easy to read, digestible, snackable” content, he adds. Hmm…it’s not easy to be always delicious, never fattening.

3)Test, test, test.

There are three ways to manage your account: Facebook direct (a live support person requires a minimum spend of 50K per month); self-managed; or via a third-party agency or Preferred Marketing Developer. Regardless of which works for you, “Stop optimizing for a click,” was well-received advice from Brittany Senko, Tourism Richmond. Be aware that soft interest produced by contests designed to increase a fan base in the past can potentially cost you when a paid campaign means you’ll only reach that soft interest. Don’t burn money.

 

4)  Why you cannot beat the almighty algorithms.

Remember Edge Rank? You needed: Affinity + Weight + Time Decay for the magic to happen. That was 2010. “The machine-learning algorithm has 100,000 variables now,” explained Elena Ferranto. According to Facebook, due to sheer volume of posts, no one user will see more than 1,500 updates every 24 hours. To reach that max, they’d need to be logged onto their newsfeed all day, so realistically it’s more like 300 posts per day being seen by the average user.

5) There are still ways to maximize Organic Reach.

Baby boomers seen in Austin

#Baby boomers getting their messages across, as seen in #TrueAustin. Use Instagram well. People and vibrant colors. Hashtags.

Facebook says:
–  User submitted content is “highly recommended, great.”
–  A ‘share’ trumps a ‘like’ every time.
–  Posts should be “very deliberately timed and regular.”
–  Post no more than 4-7 times per week or you’ll “hurt your own reach.”
–  Use 3 images together, “delivered at a higher rate” especially “vibrant, people” shots.
–  Don’t ask for likes to pages nor posts, as it will “potentially hurt your reach.”
–  And, learn to use Instagram effectively while it’s free, as demonstrated by Elena Ferranto.

6) Build fan bases strategically.

–  Custom Audiences: Facebook will encrypt and match from your mailing list.
–  Lookalike Audiences: Since Sept. 2013, Facebook will find potential new users (no email addresses are used).
–  Retargeting and Conversion Tracking: Built from website, and microsite, visits.

7)Keep building LinkedIn connections and groups.
These are the base for your CRM growth.

 8) Build buckets now.
“In two or three years, our fan bases will be too large to talk to in one go,” predicts Martin Stoll. Therefore, build special interest and demographic buckets now to target for future campaigns and avoid wasting dollars.

Matt Clement, Fort Worth CVB,  tests to acheive best ROI using clever NASCAR-related bucketing

Matt Clement, Fort Worth CVB, tests to achieve best ROI using clever NASCAR-related appeal.

 9) Use zero-based budgeting.
Assign dollars after you perform A/B testing on reach per campaign, per objective, audience. Drill down. Choose demographics and interests wisely. Target and then budget. Then test again. Good advice from Jennifer Barbee.

10)Expect more 2-way comms on your page.

Facebook has 70 engineers in Austin alone, we learned. “We’re working on messaging now, finding new ways that fans can interact with business pages,” says Krupa Patel. “Two way conversations on Facebook are important,” she added. Watch this space.  Go to http://www.etourismsummit.com for an updated agenda

 

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With our thanks to the delegates participating in this pop-up exchange. 

 

 

 

Laurie Jo Miller Farr, contributor

 

 

 

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Facebook’s Lee McCabe: “If It Works It’s Obsolete”

                                     

Facebook's Lee McCabe and Jake Steinman after the interview

Jake Steinman, founder and and CEO of eTourism Summit met recently  with Lee McCabe, Facebook’s Head of Travel, for a candid discussion about tactical ways in which destinations and attractions can use Facebook as a more effective platform.

Like the Facebook platform itself, the company’s campus in Menlo Park has changed substantially in just the year since our E-Tourism Summit (ETS) group last visited for a field trip. The complex has since grown into Main Street in a Small Town USA, with three-story buildings on both sides of the street, and they contain restaurants, bike shops, printing shops and a Facebook flagship store with all types of Facebook branded t-shirts, hoodies, and bric-a-brac.

There are “twenty-something” hipsters who seem to mix freely with more seasoned “thirty-something” adults, creating an environment that gives the headquarters the appearance of a college campus—only with an air of accountability permeating everything.

McCabe comes most recently from Expedia, where he led its hotel partnership team, and seems to have a firm grasp of the travel landscape; he has plans to grow the travel vertical team, which is based in Austin, into sub-verticals that may include one to focus on destination marketing organizations.

An excerpted version of our question-and-answer session follows: (Photo : Lee McCabe (left) at FB headquarters)

ETS: What advice would you have for travel industry sectors such as DMOs or attractions that are using Facebook’s ad platform to target prospective fans that most likely to engage with them?
McCabe: One of the biggest problems that most travel companies have is that they built an original fan base that doesn’t have an affinity for their product or destination. A good example of a DMO success is Tourism Australia, as they follow these basic principles:
o The foundation of their fan base consists of Australians who are passionate about their country
o Their fans have friends who have visited Australia
o You have those who may not know anyone living in Australia, but have visited the country and have enough passion for it to continue engaging. Nearly 90 percent of their posts are user generated. Your best marketers are friends that have been to the destination.ETS: What can the average destination say Berkeley, California learn from them?
McCabe: You really only need a few hundred people to create a rich content engine. For example, if they only had 500 fans in the beginning and their average post is seen by 30 percent of their fans, that becomes their benchmark. That means that there are some posts that are seen by only 10 percent of their fans and others that might be viewed by 50 percent. The post with the higher engagement is somehow resonating with your fan base and the best way to expand is by:
o Including similar posts in the same time slot on a similar topic
o Boost your post by using non-organic ads on Facebook to help find your target audience. For example, if a post depicting a scuba diver has generated high engagement, you target scuba divers within a 1,000-mile radius of your destination.
o This advice can be summarized by:
 Post
 Benchmark
 Boost posts that engage beyond your benchmark

ETS: How many times per day should brands post?
McCabe: It varies per brand, but generally we recommend to post two to three times a day to stay consistent and engaged.

ETS: What analytic tools are available to higher spend advertisers that are not available to those using Facebook’s self-service model?
McCabe: This depends on their KPIs (Key Performance Indicators). If we have clients that are trying to influence destination consideration, we partner with Nielsen for research measurement. If they’re trying to build traffic to their website, they can simply add a tag to the post and track the user’s visit to their site.

ETS: Are there any types of campaign or contests that you see working better than others in the travel space?
McCabe: Unless it’s something unique like Australia’s “Win the Job of Your Life,” which puts the destination at the heart of the competition, it’s difficult to see long-term success with contests or sweepstakes. In most cases, they don’t attract people who are passionate about your product. I think DMOs are best served by building campaigns around seasonal themes that support their TV, print and other (including social) efforts.

ETS: Has Facebook released any products that can be used by DMOs to enhance and assist them in preparing ROI reports for stakeholders and board members?
McCabe: We see some new models that are working well for CVBs and destinations in general.
Use Facebook Exchange to retarget your audience
Facebook Exchange (FBX) allows real-time bidding (RTB) on ad placement and retargeting. RTB lets advertisers bid in real-time on a specific ad impression rather than a larger group, allowing advertisers to show more relevant ads and run more effective campaigns. For instance, if a person is looking at a certain hotel on that hotel’s website, the next time they log into Facebook, that hotel’s ad can show up in the person’s News Feed (which is the most engaging part of Facebook).
Use Custom Audiences
 Custom Audiences allows marketers to find their current customers on Facebook and reach them with relevant ads. So, for example, if an airline has a database of the emails for the people who flew to Hawaii last Christmas, they can use Custom Audiences to reach that same group of people on Facebook and show them an ad on Facebook for a discounted rate to Hawaii this holiday season.

ETS: What other spin-off opportunities does this create?
McCabe: There’s now a new opportunity for co-branding by creating a new packaging offer with an airline or hotel partner that is more attractive. This information can be obtained through data-share agreements with airlines or from Sojern, Adara and other full service DSPs (Data Service Platforms) such as Bluekai or Triggit.

ETS: With the growing importance of “photography marketing,” how can travel brands use the Instagram platform more effectively i.e., is it feasible to market certain images to specific targets, etc.?
McCabe: While we’ve said that ads will come to Instagram within the next year, there are no marketing products on the platform at this time. That said, we’ve seen brands across all verticals effectively build engaged audiences on Instagram, and if you think about it, travel makes sense. Instagram is an aspirational platform focused on beautiful content. Look at what a brand like Starwood Hotels has started to build on Instagram and you can see the possibilities: http://instagram.com/spg

ETS: What are the biggest changes in the past year for those who are seeking organic engagement?
McCabe: Your ads should be great quality and relevant to your target audience. We work with brands that believe to “always live in beta” and “if it works, it’s obsolete.” It’s important to learn how to target the fans that are willing to engage and they may not be your friends. We have over 1.1 billion people on Facebook and you may now find people around the world, for example in Scotland who somehow love your product. It’s all about finding the people who matter.

ETS: Are any companies doing a good job of understanding your full targeting capabilities?
McCabe:   MGM Resorts has done an excellent job using Facebook to acquire new customers, convert them into guests, and ultimately brand loyalists. They have consistently seen returns on ad spend higher than 3X for each stage of the purchase.
Using products Custom Audiences and retargeting on Facebook Exchange, the brand has seen a positive return on ad spend
Results
5X+ return on ad spend using custom audiences targeting its customers on Facebook
15X return on ad spend using Facebook Exchange

HotelTonight sought to acquire new customers who would download its last-minute hotel booking app and ultimately use it to book reservations.
To acquire users /app downloads

HotelTonight used Facebook’s granular targeting and two key products: the mobile app install ad and Facebook Offers.
Results
10X higher click-to-install rate from the mobile app install ads, compared to standard mobile banner ads (between October and December 2012).
According to booking and registration data, 80% higher return on ad spend from Facebook Offers than average mobile advertising spend.

ETS: What is the spending threshold at Facebook’s travel vertical where they can receive live support?
McCabe: We aren’t able to share this information at this time.

ETS: One final question. Can you tell us what you plan to talk about at the E-Tourism Summit?
McCabe: My presentation will focus on customization and targeting for travel destinations and suppliers.

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Filed under Custom Audiences, DMOs, Facebook, Instagram